Board

ATLAS Arts’ Board of Directors are a lively and highly engaged group, who bring a broad range of skills and experiences to support the good governance of the organisation.

Board meetings take place in May, August, November and February. Each board member can serve up to two, three-year terms.

If you’d like to see copies of our board minutes, get in touch with admin@atlasarts.org.uk

If you are interested in joining the ATLAS Board, get in touch with ainslie@atlasarts.org.uk (Ainslie Roddick)


Jenny Brownrigg

Acting Chair

Jenny is an exhibitions curator who has worked in higher arts education, firstly at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design then at The Glasgow School of Art. She originally studied Drawing & Painting at GSA then a Masters of Fine Art and Public Art at DJCAD. Before she became a curator, formative experiences were as a Pier Art Centre Fellow, spending six months over winter in Stromness; and also Writer in Residence at Grizedale Arts in the Lake District. She is a board member at Pier Arts Centre and at Glasgow Sculpture Studios.

A significant strand of her research is on early 20th century women documentary filmmakers and photographers in Scotland, including M.E.M. Donaldson, who photographed her Skye walks.

Jenny is slowly learning to use a Graflex Series B camera, similar to Margaret Fay Shaw’s camera, to understand more about the technical and creative process of this format.


Sue Pirnie

Sue has worked in the Visual Arts in various roles including: running Highland Council’s galleries and developing pop up exhibitions, initiating artists residencies in schools and communities and permanent commissions in public places, and exhibitions by Highland artists internationally. 10 years at the Scottish Arts Council advising arts organisations across Scotland led to freelance work in this area. Working with fewer organisations in more depth included leading strategic planning and capital projects, while research studies for national bodies included defining the economic value of Gaelic culture.

These jobs required travelling extensively throughout Scotland and the Highlands – an area she loves since moving to a croft on the Black Isle over 40 years ago. Enjoying walking or skiing in the mountains, her more unusual views of the Highlands have been underwater; a scuba instructor in her spare time she’s dived in exceptional locations internationally, but favourites are closer, St Kilda’s marine SSI and the battleships and superb underwater landscapes of the Orkneys.


Donald Macfarlane Hyslop

Donald’s work explores the role culture, architecture, food and museums can play in the regeneration, place-making, economic and social development of cities and communities. He lectures and teaches widely on cultural and business policy, urban renewal, food markets, community empowerment and creative cities.

An Urbanist and Head of Regeneration and Community for Tate Galleries, he has variously combined with being Chair of M7 Global Food Markets Alliance, Chair of Borough Market and Chair of Better Bankside Business Improvement District, one of the founding British BIDs. He also undertakes a portfolio of advisory work, including for the British Council, UK Trade, CABE, the Design Council and a range of private clients.


Anna Jobson

A London-based consultant who specialises in strategy, policy and organisational development in the arts, heritage and education sectors, Anna has had a wide-ranging portfolio career combining international freelance work with leadership roles in some of the foremost organisations in the UK and Australia. Her first connection with Atlas Arts came through a mutual connection based in Sydney.

Anna's interest in the arts is professional and personal, and she spends her free time visiting museums and galleries and indulging interests in theatre and contemporary dance. As a mum of three, she has enjoyed revisiting her childhood love of fairy tales and storytelling and experiencing the extraordinary cultural offer for children and young people. She is an avid reader of fiction, a keen traveller (at the moment mostly mentally), a slow cyclist and a baker.


Sophie Morrish

Sophie Morrish is a visual artist based in rural Stirlingshire. Sophie’s creative practice draws upon direct engagement with the natural world. Her work is underpinned by a life-long passion for nature, curiosity towards natural phenomena and human perception of the ‘other’.

From 2007 - 2017 Sophie lived and worked on North Uist. Here, alongside her work as an artist, she was a lecturer and course leader for the University of the Highlands and Islands/ Lews Castle College, BA Fine Art course, based at Taigh Chearsabhagh Museum and Art Centre. Sophie now lives on a plot ‘embedded’ within an industrial dairy farm, where she and her partner work to preserve and enhance the dwindling natural habitat around them. She has two rescue dogs and is known for being somewhat accident prone!

With extensive experience in the creative education sector, Sophie has worked with a broad range of learners and institutions as diverse as HMP Brixton, London, Central Academy of Fine Art, Beijing, China, and M.S. University Vadodra, India. Sophie relocated from London to Scotland in 1996, working as a lecturer at the Glasgow School of Art between 1994 and 2006.


Catherine MacPhee

Catherine is an archivist who grew up on Skye, allowing her to engage with community groups across Skye and Lochalsh while preserving and protecting the culture. She has a wide range of job experiences while growing up in Skye, including at the former An Tuireann Arts Centre, in a range of hospitality roles and briefly as a financial advisor. She has a strong knowledge of local culture and a deep connection to the place she grew up.

She is currently studying for her MLitt in Archives and Records Management with Dundee University and works at the Archive and Resource Centre in Portree. Catherine can be found at various music festivals and events at home and abroad. Other interests are yoga, growing vegetables, baking and reading a wide variety of literature, perhaps too much nonfiction.


Freya Rowe

Freya lives and works on the Isle of Raasay, a short journey from the small village of Plockton, Lochalsh, where she grew up. With her partner David and her mother Lyn, she has created a sustainable family business in Raasay House, enabling the community to attract major funding to transform Raasay House into a valuable community asset. Freya is passionate about sharing the beauty and uniqueness of Raasay by encouraging visitors to connect to this landscape.

Having studied for a year at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art, she takes great pleasure in art and creativity influences much of what she does. Freya has enjoyed working with various community groups supporting projects which help sustain this fragile island community and bring benefits to residents and businesses alike. She is a mother of two and loves spending time with her family. In the winter she loves to travel and in the rare moments of free time in the summer, you will find her loch swimming or e-biking around the island.